Recommended Reading

Recently Published Books | Alphabetical Order by Author

 

For an Introduction to Florida Archaeology

Florida's First People: 12,000 Years of Human History
by Robin C. Brown. 1994. Pineapple Press.

Florida's First People uses the discoveries at five archaeological sites around the state to illustrate the major culture periods of Florida prehistory.

The Southeastern Indians
by Charles Hudson. 1976. University of Tennessee Press. Ordering Info

A comprehensive introduction to the native peoples of the Southeast.

Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1994. University Press of Florida.

A general overview of Florida's precolumbian archaeology.

Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1995. University Press of Florida.

Native Florida peoples and their interactions with Spanish and French explorers and colonists-- where the native groups came from, where they lived, and what happened to them.

The Timucuan Chiefdoms of Spanish Florida, Volume I: Assimilation; Volume II: Resistance and Destruction
by John E. Worth. 1998. University Press of Florida.

These two books trace the effects of European exploration and colonization on the Timucuan people of North Florida.

The Apalachee Indians and Mission San Luis
by John H. Hann and Bonnie G McEwan. 1998. University Press of Florida.

This book portrays the dwellings, daily life, religious practices, social structures, and recreation activities of the Apalachee Indians.

Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians
by Brent Richards Weisman. 1999. University Press of Florida.

This book explores Seminole and Miccosukee culture through information provided by archaeology, ethnography, historical documents, and the words of the Indians themselves.

 

Recently Published Books

The Calusa and Their Legacy: South Florida People and Their Environments
by Darcie A. MacMahon and William H. Marquardt. 2004. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

The Calusa and Their Legacy is the first popular book focusing on the Calusa Indians, their ancestors, and the coastal water world in which they lived. It also takes a look at the arts and culture of contemporary south Florida Indian people--the Seminole and Miccosukee. This wonderfully illustrated volume is a delightful rendering of one of the truly unique archaeological and natural areas in the Americas. Anyone interested in North American Indians, Florida, and the natural history of coastal environments of yesterday and today will love this book.

Bioarchaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast: Adaptation, Conflict, and Change
by Dale L. Hutchinson. 2004. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Dale Hutchinson explores the role of human adaptation along the Gulf Coast of Florida and the influence of coastal foraging on several indigenous Florida populations. The Sarasota landmark known as Historic Spanish Point has captured the attention of historians and archaeologists for over 150 years. This picturesque location includes remnants of a prehistoric Indian village and a massive ancient burial mound-- known to archaeologists as the Palmer Site--that is one of the largest mortuary sites uncovered in the southeastern United States.

Presidio Santa María de Galve: A Struggle for Survival in Colonial Spanish Pensacola
by Judith A. Bense. 2003. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This examination of the Pensacola presidio and its fort during the first Spanish colonial period provides a rich inventory of artifacts and new interpretations of life among the 18th-century settlers and their evolving interactions with local native populations and with Mobile and Veracruz. Based on long-term interdisciplinary study and excavation, Judith Bense's book provides the first intensive account of an early colonial Spanish presidio in La Florida

Indians of Central and South Florida, 1513-1763
by John H. Hann. 2003. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

In this latest book, Hann discusses the peoples who occupied an area south of a line drawn roughly from the mouth of the Withlacoochee River eastward to Turtle Mound, located a little north of Cape Canaveral. He focuses on the Calusa of the southwest coast, the people of the Tampa Bay region, and the Surruque and Ais and their kin of the east coast from Turtle Mound southward through the Keys, as well as their hinterland kin from the St. Johns through the Kissimmee valleys. Using original unpublished sources that are virtually unknown to most anthropologists and archaeologists, Hann examines documents from the first periods of contact in North America. He also analyzes archaeological investigations from the last quarter century, particularly those involving the Calusa and the Tequesta living at the mouth of the Miami River. Common features among these people, he concludes, are the almost total absence of agriculture in their lives and their slight, episodic contact with Spaniards.

Windover: Multidisciplinary Investigations of an Early Archaic Florida Cemetery
by Glen H. Doran. 2002. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

With respect to the bog burial tradition, Florida is unique, producing one of the largest inventories of North American skeletal remains older than 6,000 years. Near Titusville, Florida, in 1984, excavations began at the Windover archaeological site, the New World's largest cemetery of this antiquity. This book is the first complete summary of the multiple investigations conducted there by archaeologists and specialists from across the nation and provides the first detailed overview of the population, and in particular the mortuary customs, from this Early Archaic era.

Archaeology of the Everglades
by John W. Griffin. 2002. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Originally prepared as a report for the National Park Service in 1988, Griffin's work places the human occupation of the Everglades within the context of South Florida's unique natural environmental systems. He documents, for the first time, the little known but relatively extensive precolumbian occupation of the interior portion of the region and surveys the material culture of the Glades area. He also provides an account of the evolution of the region's climate and landscape and a history of previous archaeological research in the area and fuses ecological and material evidence into a discussion of the sequence and distribution of cultures, social organization, and lifeways of the Everglades inhabitants.

Ancient Miamians: The Tequesta of South Florida
by William E. McGoun. 2002. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Focusing on the Native Americans the Spanish called Tequesta and their ancestors, Ancient Miamians covers the 10,000 years from 8,000 B.C. to A.D. 1761, painting a vivid word portrait of a resident from each of six eras as they make tools, obtain food, deal with their fellow humans, and seek harmony with the forces that govern their lives.

Histories of Southeastern Archaeology
Edited by Shannon Tushingham, Jane Hill, and Charles H. McNutt 2002. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

This book tells us how we learned what we now know about the Southeast's unwritten past. Of obvious interest to professionals and students of the field, this volume will also be sought after by historians, political scientists, amateurs, and anyone interested in the South.

Pioneer in Space and Time: John Mann Goggin and the Development of Florida Archaeology
by Brent Richards Weisman. 2002. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This biography of John Mann Goggin recounts the story of Florida archaeology from its 19th-century beginnings to the present through the life of its most influential pioneer, a charismatic personality who, more than any other individual, shaped and reshaped Florida archaeology. It is a story of a time and place long vanished, when Florida fieldwork was always an adventure. Florida archaeology has been influencing the development of archaeological content and theory on a national level for more than a century and Goggin has been a major participant in this evolution.

Religion, Power, and Politics in Colonial St. Augustine
by Robert L. Kapitzke. 2001. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This book offers an analysis of the religious world of colonial St. Augustine, Florida, focusing on the daily rituals that defined a Catholic life, as well as on the conflicts between religious and political leaders that defined and shaped the city's social milieu.

Bioarchaeology of Spanish Florida: The Impact of Colonialism
by Edited by Clark Spencer Larsen. 2001. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This book address the biological consequences of the arrival of Europeans in the New World and on the lifeways of native populations following contact in the late 16th century. The result of a 20-year project directed by the editor, this work involved a team of scientists who explicitly addressed their research to the study of an extensive series of human remains. No comparable body of information currently exists for any other area of the New World.

 

Alphabetical Order by Author

Archaeology of the Southeastern United States
by Judith A. Bense. 1994. Academic Press. Ordering Info

A chronological summary of major stages in Southeastern United States' development, this unique text overviews the region's archaeology from 20,000 years ago to World War I. Early chapters review the history and development of archaeology as a discipline. The following chapters, organized in chronological order, highlight the archaeological characteristics of each featured period. The book's final chapters discuss new directions in Southeastern archaeology, including trends in teaching, research, the business of archaeology, and the public's growing interest. This versatile text perfectly suits undergraduates or anyone requiring a hands-on guide for self-exploration of the fascinating region.

Archaeology of Colonial Pensacola
Edited by Judith A. Bense. 1999. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Offering a new perspective on the city that anchored European settlement on the Gulf Coast, this collection provides a major contribution to the archaeology and history of Florida and adjoining states, especially during the Late Colonial period (1750-1821), when Pensacola moved through Spanish, then British, then Spanish occupation.

New Words, Old Songs: Understanding the Lives of Ancient Peoples in Southwest Florida Through Archaeology
by Charles Blanchard, illustrated by Merald Clark. 1995. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

Here They Once Stood: The Tragic End of the Apalachee Missions
by Mark F. Boyd, Hale G. Smith, and John W. Griffin. 1999. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Here They Once Stood was first published in 1951 and is a classic example of collaborative research. It presents the first-hand accounts describing the horrific fate of the missions and provides archaeological reports documenting the missions and the lives of the native people.

The Northwest Florida Expeditions of Clarence Bloomfield Moore
Edited by David S. Brose and Nancy Marie White. 1999. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

This comprehensive compilation of Moore's archaeological reports on northwest Florida and southern Alabama and Georgia presents the earliest documented investigations of this region.

Florida's First People : 12,000 Years of Human History
by Robin C. Brown. 1994. Pineapple Press. Ordering Info

The early people who inhabited Florida--from about 12,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age until the first Europeans set foot in the state in the early 1500s--developed diverse, hardy, and complex societies. Dramatic archaeological advances in methods of excavation, preservation, and analysis are bringing to light a wealth of new information about these people and their lifestyles. Florida's First People uses the fascinating discoveries at five archaeological sites around the state to illustrate the major culture periods of Florida prehistory.

Spanish Colonial Silver Coins in the Florida Collection
by Alan K. Craig. 2000. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

The State of Florida owns a vast collection, nearly 23,000 specimens, of Spanish treasure coins salvaged from shipwrecks in Florida waters. It is the largest of its kind in existence. Alan Craig explains the circumstances behind their manufacture and describes the transporting of these unique hand-made coins, a complicated business full of intrigue and royal regulations.

Spanish Colonial Gold Coins in the Florida Collection
by Alan K. Craig. 2000. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This is an updated version of the author's earlier publication, Gold Coins of the 1715 Spanish Fleet (now out of print), it includes more than 100 new additions to the collection. This is a companion volume to Spanish Colonial Silver Coins in the Florida Collection

Exploration of Ancient Key-Dweller Remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida
by Frank H. Cushing. 2000. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

First published more than 100 years ago, this illustrated monograph on the Key Marco site on Florida's Gulf Coast reports on archaeological discoveries that have never been duplicated.

Fort Mose: Colonial America's Black Fortress of Freedom
by Kathleen Deagan and Darcie MacMahon. 1995. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This book tells the story of Fort Mose and the people who lived there. It challenges the notion of the American black colonial experience as only that of slavery, offering instead a richer and more balanced view of the black experience in the Spanish colonies from the arrival of Columbus to the American Revolution.

Hernando de Soto among the Apalachee: The Archaeology of the First Winter Encampment
by Charles R. Ewen and John H. Hann. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This book chronicles the discovery and excavation of the only known campsite of Hernando de Soto in La Florida.

Key Marco's Buried Treasure: Archaeology and Adventure in the Nineteenth Century
by Marion Spjut Gilliland. 1988. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Time and Space Perspective in Northern St. Johns Archeology, Florida
by John M. Goggin. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

First published in 1952, this book literally defined much of Florida archaeology and has remained the basis for all archaeological understanding of the St. Johns River area.

Fifty Years of Southeastern Archaeology: Selected Works of John W. Griffin
Edited by Patricia C. Griffin. 1995. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Griffin was the first professional archaeologist employed in the state of Florida (1946). His frequently cited scholarship stands the test of time, and he was widely regarded as a friend, mentor, and source of wisdom among his colleagues. This volume includes 16 selections from Griffin's extensive publication list, which began in the 1930s. Ten of the essays relate to Florida archaeology and history, while the others cover investigations in other parts of the Southeast and the Midwest.

Translations
by John. H. Hann. 1986. Florida Archaeology 2. Ordering Info

Translation of the Ecija Voyages of 1605 and 1609 and the Gonzalez Derrotero of 1609; Translation of Governor Rebolledo's 1657 Visitation of Three Florida Provinces and Related Documents; Church Furnishings, Sacred Vessels and Vestments Held by the Missions of Florida: Translation of Two Inventories; Translation of Alonso de Leturiondo's Memorial to the King of Spain

Apalachee: The Land between the Rivers
by John H. Hann. 1988. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

John Hann focuses in this study on the Apalachee Indians and their interactions with the Spanish during the historic period. Following a description of the prehistoric Apalachee, Hann delves into the encounters between the Apalachee and the first European intruders. He synthesizes historical and archaeological information on the establishment and growth of the western Florida missions, including pertinent data from the prominent and pivotal state of San Luis de Talimali.

Visitations and Revolts in Florida, 1656-1695
John H. Hann. 1993. Florida Archaeology 7. Ordering Info

This volume presents translations of some of the best sources of information on the missions of Spanish Florida and the natives whom they served in the second half of the seventeenth century.

A History of the Timucua Indians and Missions
by John H. Hann. 1996. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

When Spanish and French explorers first landed in Florida early in the 16th century, Timucua speakers occupied more land area and were more numerous than any other aboriginal group. This is their first detailed history, a major study that places its author in the forefront of Spanish colonial historians working in the United States. Relying on previously unused documents, this account of the Timucua traces their experience from first contact with Europeans to their exile to Cuba in 1763 and their final eradication.

The Apalachee Indians and Mission San Luis
by John H. Hann and Bonnie G McEwan. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

The Apalachee Indians of northwest Florida and their Spanish conquerors come alive in this lavishly illustrated story of their premier community, San Luis. With a cast of characters that includes friars, soldiers, civilians, a Spanish governor, and a diverse native population, the book portrays the dwellings, daily life, religious practices, social structures, and recreation activities at the mission.

San Pedro y San Pablo de Patale: A Seventeenth-Century Spanish Mission in Leon County, Florida
by B. Calvin Jones, John Hann, and John F. Scarry. 1991. Florida Archaeology 5. Ordering Info

The mission described in this volume was one of several Franciscan missions established in the Province of Apalachee after 1633. The report summarizes excavations conducted in 1971 and incorporates historical research on the mission into the analysis of archaeological findings.

Sharks and Shark Products In Prehistoric South Florida
by Laura Kozuch. 1993. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

Culture and Environment in the Domain of the Calusa
Edited by William Marquardt. 1992. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

The Archaeology of Useppa Island
Edited by William Marquardt. 1999. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

The Seminole Indians of Florida
by Clay MacCauley. 2000. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This classic portrait of the Seminole people, written at a time when their way of life was virtually unknown to the rest of the world, was originally published by the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of Ethnology in 1889.

The Spanish Missions of La Florida
Edited by Bonnie G. McEwan. 1993. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Indians of the Greater Southeast Historical Archaeology and Ethnohistory
Edited by Bonnie G. McEwan. 2000. University Press of Florida.Ordering Info

This volume brings together a stellar group of scholars to summarize what we know of the development of native American cultures in the southeastern United States after 1500. The authors integrate archaeological, documentary, and ethnohistorical evidence in the most comprehensive examination of diverse southeastern Indian cultures published in decades.

Prehistoric Peoples of South Florida
by William E. McGoun. 1993. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

This volume considers the cultural history of the real South Florida dating from 10,000 B.C. through the invasion by Europeans and analyzes the ways in which they adapted to their environment through time--or caused their environment to adapt to their needs.

Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1994. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This record of precolumbian Florida brings to life the 12,000-year story of the native American Indians who lived in the state. Using information gathered by archaeological investigations, many carried out since 1980, Jerald Milanich describes the indigenous cultures and explains why they developed as they did

Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1995. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Focusing on those native peoples and their interactions with Spanish and French explorers and colonists, Jerald Milanich delineates this massive cultural change. Using information gathered from archaeological excavations and from the interpretation of historical documents left behind by the colonial powers, he explains where the native groups came from, where they lived, and what happened to them. He closes with the tragic disappearance of the original inhabitants in the eighteenth century and the first appearance of the ancestors of Florida's present Native Americans.

The Timucua
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1996. Blackwell Publishers. Ordering Info

This is the story of the Timucua, an American Indian people who thrived for centuries in the southeast portion of what is now the United States of America. Two hundred and fifty years after Ponce de Leon's voyage the Timucua had disappeared, extinguished by the ravages of colonialism. Who were the Timucua? Where did they come from? How did they live? What caused their extinction? These are questions this book attempts to answer, using information gathered from archaeological excavations and from the interpretation of historical documents left behind by the European powers, mainly Spain and France, who sought to colonize Florida and to place the Timucua under their sway.

Florida's Indians from Ancient Times to the Present
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Florida's Indians tells the story of the native societies that have lived in Florida for twelve millennia, from the early hunters at the end of the Ice Age to the modern Seminole, Miccosukee, and Creeks.

Laboring in the Fields of the Lord, Spanish Missions and Southeastern Indians
by Jerald T. Milanich. 1999. Smithsonian Institution Press. Ordering Info

Laboring in the Fields of the Lord uses the latest archaeological and historical discoveries to tell the story of theLa Florida missions, their impact on native people, and their demise.

Famous Florida Sites: Mt. Royal and Crystal River
by Edited by Jerald T. Milanich. 1999. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Famous Florida Sites is a compilation of articles on the Mt. Royal and Crystal River sites. The introduction by Milanich places both monuments in context and addresses the persistent controversies and uncertainties that surround them.

Archaeology of Northern Florida, A.D. 200-900: The McKeithen Weeden Island Culture
by Jerald T. Milanich, Ann S. Cordell, Vernon J. Knight, Jr., Timothy A. Kohler, Brenda J. Sigler-Lavelle. 1997. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

In this volume the authors draw on north Florida archaeological excavations and site surveys to unlock the secrets of the Weeden Island culture and its magnificent ceramics. In particular, investigations at the McKeithen site, a multi-mound village site, provide information used to place the culture within the evolutionary framework of native societies in the southeastern United States. New radiocarbon dates from that site establish a firm chronological framework for Weeden Island developments.

Hernando De Soto and the Indians of Florida
by Jerald T. Milanich and Charles Hudson. 1993. University Press of Florida.Ordering Info

Matching de Soto's route and camps to sites where artifacts from the de Soto era have been found, the authors reconstruct his route in Florida and at the same time clarify questions about the social geography and political relationships of the Florida Indians. They link names once known only from documents (e.g., the Uzita, who occupied territory at the de Soto landing site, and the Aguacaleyquen of north peninsular Florida) to actual archaeological remains and sites.

First Encounters: Spanish Explorations in the Caribbean and the United States, 1492-1570
by Jerald T. Milanich and Susan Milbrath. 1989. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Drawing on the most recent historical and archaeological research, First Encounters describes the period of early Spanish contact with New World peoples. This series of highly readable essays reports original research and investigations mounted over the last ten years, a decade of remarkable breakthroughs in our knowledge about significant events in the first decades after 1492.

Tacachale: Essays on the Indians of Florida and Southeastern Georgia During the Historic Period
Edited by Jerald T. Milanich and Samuel Proctor. 1994. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Tacachale ---a Timucuan word that means "to light a new fire"--refers to an Indian ritual that the Timucuans used to minimize impending change and maintain their way of life. In these essays it symbolizes the efforts of the aborigines of Florida and southeastern Georgia to deal with the destruction of their cultures during the period of European colonization.

An Environmental History of Northeast Florida
by James J. Miller 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

This story of the land and people in that region of the St. Johns River and the Atlantic coast covers 18,000 years--from the Ice Age to the first half of the 20th century. James Miller describes how natural features transformed and how cultural traditions of native people, as well as Spanish, English, and American colonists, developed in response to opportunities and constraints of the environment. With an unusually broad scope in time, space, and subject matter, he uses the example of northeast Florida to explore the notion of environmental equilibrium, to illustrate the fallacy of a pristine environment, and to show how essential environmental history is to modern ecological planning

The East Florida Expeditions of Clarence Bloomfield Moore
Edited by Jeffrey M. Mitchem. 1999. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

East Florida Expeditions is a compilation of C. B. Moore's archaeological publications on eastern Florida. The introduction by Mitchem summarizes and analyzes Moore's work.

The West and Central Florida Expeditions of Clarence Bloomfield Moore
Edited by Jeffrey M. Mitchem. 1999. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

West and Central Florida Expeditions is a compilation of C. B. Moore's archaeological publications on western and central Florida.

Indian Art of Ancient Florida
by Barbara A. Purdy. 1996. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

For thousands of years, the Indians of Florida created exquisite objects from the natural materials available to them--wood, bone, stone,clay, and shell. This full-color book, the first devoted exclusively to the artistic achievements of the Florida aborigines, describes and pictures 116 of these masterpieces.

Art and Archaeology of Florida's Wetlands
by Barbara A. Purdy. 1991. CRC Press. Ordering Info

This book compiles detailed accounts of such famous sites as Key Marco, Little Salt Spring, Windover, Ft. Center, and others. The book discusses wet site environments and explains the kinds of physical, chemical, and structural components required to ensure that the proper conditions for site formation are present and prevail through time.

Stability and Change in Guale Indian Pottery, 1300-1702
by Rebecca Saunders. 2000. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

Through a comprehensive study of changing pottery attributes, Saunders documents the clash of Spanish and Native American cultures in the 16th-century southeastern United States. By studying the ceramic traditions of the Guale Indians, Rebecca Saunders provides evidence of change in Native American lifeways from prehistory through European contact and the end of the Mission period.

Fort Center: An Archaeological Site in the Lake Okeechobee Basin
by William H. Sears. 1994. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Raising intriguing questions about the relationship of South Florida's prehistoric population to the Caribbean basin and about the origins of maize agriculture in the eastern United States, William Sears documents years of fieldwork at Fort Center, a site in the Lake Okeechobee Basin that was named for a nineteenth-century Seminole War fort. The Belle Glade people--by 500 B.C. the first inhabitants of the site--cultivated maize, draining their earliest fields with large circular ditches. Later fields resembled the raised linear earth mounds found at sites in Mesoamerica and northern South America. Excavations uncovered a charnel platform adorned with wood carvings of animals that was preserved in the mucky bottom of a pond, providing an unparalleled collection of prehistoric Indian art.

Archaeology at San Luis: Broad-Scale Testing, 1984-1985
by Gary Shapiro. 1987. Florida Archaeology 3. Ordering Info

From 1656 to 1704, San Luis de Talimali was the administrative, religious, and military capital of Spanish missions among the Apalachee Indians. The site was acquired by the State of Florida in 1983 and officially opened to the public as San Luis Archaeological and Historic Site on March 25, 1985. This volume describes the results of the first year's archaeological research at San Luis and begins to define the Spanish and Indian components of the town plan.

Archaeology at San Luis Part One: The Apalachee Council House; Part Two: the Church Complex
by Gary Shapiro, Bonnie G. McEwan, and Richard Vernon. 1992. Florida Archaeology 6. Ordering Info

An Atlas of Maritime Florida
by Roger C. Smith, James J. Miller, Sean M. Kelley, and Linda Harbin. 1997. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

The first maritime atlas of Florida offers a generously illustrated introduction to 13,000 years of Florida maritime history and geography, from dugout canoes to modern-day maritime travel and industry. The atlas begins with an overview of Florida's physical environment, including its bathymetry and shoreline, winds, and currents. Subsequent chapters explore the growth of Florida's maritime industries and survey ship types, lighthouse locations, ports, and navigational hazards like hurricanes and reefs.

Early History of the Creek Indians and Their Neighbors
by John R. Swanton. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

First published in 1922, copies of this respected classic have been coveted, hoarded, and worn ragged ever since by archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians across the Southeast and beyond. Also appealing to a general audience, the book documents the coalescence of the Creek Indians out of the remnants of the many separate societies that dominated Alabama and Georgia in the early colonial period (pre-1700). The author provides important, basic ethnographic and historical information on the Creeks and all the neighboring Indians, including those from Florida, Mississippi, and adjacent areas, tracing the tribes' movements from earliest times until they were caught up into the stream of colonial history.

The Persistence of Sail in the Age of Steam: Underwater Archaeological Evidence from the Dry Tortugas
by Donna J. Souza. 1998. Plenum Press. Ordering Info

Using an anthropologically oriented research design, this investigation of the wrecks of six sailing ships dating from the middle to late nineteenth century shows how merchant sailing attempted to compete with steamships, not only through technological adaptation, but also through increased risk-taking. Souza addresses risk-taking behavior, its archaeological signatures, and supporting evidence.

Bibliography of Florida Archaeology Through 1980, Index to Bibliography of Florida Archaeology Through 1980
Edited by Gregory Toole et al. 1986. Florida Archaeology 1. Ordering Info

This is a basic reference work that should be useful to anyone interested in pursuing research on the archaeology of Florida. In addition to an extensive list of available publications arranged by author, the volume contains an index that cross-references entries by region, county, author, and keywords.

The Domain of the Calusa
Video. 1995. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

Expedition Florida: From Exploration to Exhibition
Video. 1999. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

Expedition Florida: Wild Alachua
Video. 2002. IAPS Books. Ordering Info

Excavations on the Franciscan Frontier: Archaeology at the Fig Springs Mission
by Brent Richards Weisman. 1992. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Crystal River: A Ceremonial Mound Center on the Florida Gulf Coast
by Brent R. Weisman. 1995. Florida Archaeology 8. Ordering Info

The Crystal River mound complex is perhaps the most widely recognized archaeological site in the State of Florida. This volume summarizes the archaeological research that has been conducted on the site over the last 100 years, and outlines the intriguing questions that remain to be answered about this important ceremonial center.

Unconquered People: Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians
by Brent Richards Weisman. 1999. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Unconquered People explores Seminole and Miccosukee culture through information provided by archaeology, ethnography, historical documents, and the words of the Indians themselves. It explains when and how their culture was formed and how it has withstood historical challenges and survives in the face of pressures from the modern world.

Grit-Tempered: Early Women Archaeologists in the Southeastern United States
Edited by Nancy Marie White, Lynne P. Sullivan, and Rochelle A. Marrinan. 1999. University Press of Florida.Ordering Info

Grit-Tempered documents the lives and work of pioneering women archaeologists in the southeastern United States, from the 1920s through the 1960s, portraying their professional accomplishments in the context of their personal lives.

The Tree That Bends: Discourse, Power, and the Survival of the Maskókî People
by Patricia Riles Wickman 1999. University of Alabama Press. Ordering Info

In this volume, Patricia Riles Wickman rejects the myth that erases Native Americans from Florida through the agency of Spaniards and diseases. She also refutes the accompanying assumption that the area was an empty frontier at the time of American expansion.

Archeology of the Florida Gulf Coast
by Gordon R. Willey. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

Fifty years after its first publication by the Smithsonian Institution, this landmark work is back in print. It continues to offer a major synthesis of the archaeology of the Florida Gulf Coast, with complete descriptions and illustrations of all the pottery types found in the area.

The Timucuan Chiefdoms of Spanish Florida, Volume I: Assimilation
by John E. Worth. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

John Worth traces the effects of European exploration and colonization in the late 1500s and describes the expansion of the mission frontier before 1630. As a framework for understanding the Timucuan rebellion of 1654 and its pacification, he explores the internal political and economic structure of the colonial system.

The Timucuan Chiefdoms of Spanish Florida, Volume II: Resistance and Destruction
by John E. Worth. 1998. University Press of Florida. Ordering Info

In volume II, John Worth shows that after the geographic and political restructuring of the Timucua mission province, the interior of Florida became a populated chain of way-stations along the royal road between St. Augustine and the Apalachee province. Finally, he describes rampant demographic collapse in the missions, followed by English sponsored raids, setting a stage for their final years in Florida during the mid-1700s.


Additions, corrections, etc. Contact flarch@flmnh.ufl.edu.