Page 1 - Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Florida

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Tracking Information
Project Agreement Number:
08013
Project Title:
Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Florida
Project Directors:
Kenneth L. Krysko, Kevin M. Enge, Paul E. Moler
Dates Covered by Report:
1 July 2008 through 31 December 2011
Date Report was Submitted:
15 December 2011
Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Florida
KENNETH L. KRYSKO
,
Florida Museum of Natural History, Museum Road, Dickinson Hall,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA (e-mail: kenneyk@flmnh.ufl.edu)
KEVIN M. ENGE
,
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 SW Williston
Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA (e-mail: kevin.enge@MyFWC.com)
PAUL E. MOLER
,
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 1105 SW Williston
Road, Gainesville, FL 32601, USA (e-mail: paul.moler@MyFWC.com)
Abstract:
We compiled a total of 134,404 vouchered records (specimens or photographs) of
Florida amphibians and reptiles from 58 museums or other institutions. We supplemented these
records with 43,319 unvouchered or unverified records from the scientific and popular literature,
reports, and credible survey databases. Whenever possible, questionable vouchers were
examined by the authors or by staff of the institutions where the specimens were housed, and
corrections were made when needed. Unverified records could not be examined, and we
excluded unverified records considered to be of unlikely validity. We georeferenced all records
and then used these data to generate distributional maps for the 142 native and 56 non-native
species of amphibians and reptiles known to occur in Florida. Maps for each species are
accompanied by the species current scientific and common names, a brief discussion of its
geographic distribution (including the number of vouchered records and counties in which it has
been found, potential counties of occurrence, and/or identification errors), earliest known
voucher, and taxonomy (if changed recently). Discussion of the physiography, climate, river
drainages, biogeography, habitats, and ecoregions of Florida provides context for understanding
patterns of distribution of the Florida herpetofauna.
Key words:
amphibians, reptiles, species, geographic distribution, maps, taxonomy, vouchers