Mollie Doctrow’s woodcut prints on display Thursday at Florida Museum

December 15th, 2009

Photos available

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The Florida Museum of Natural History will showcase a new Galleria exhibit by Mollie Doctrow entitled “Seasonal Crossings: Environmental Woodcuts of Central and South Florida” beginning Thursday.

The exhibit features woodcut prints inspired by native Florida habitats and plant species. Doctrow’s prints are portraits of plants and plant communities, some of which are endemic, and others that are rare or endangered.

“A dominant theme of my artwork is the drama of the moment, a personal interaction with a particular place,” Doctrow said. “The work represents natural forms processed accurately and expressively, going beyond documentation. The woodcut medium and the carving process suit this expressive depiction.”

While working in the tradition of Western landscape art, the prints are also influenced by Oriental art. Doctrow aims to simplify the composition and achieve a yin-and-yang balance between the black and white areas or the carved and un-carved areas.

Doctrow’s work begins with field sketches of natural places. The sketches are then transferred to woodblocks and the final image is completed during the carving process. “Through this artwork I connect to the natural world and hope to bring attention to these fragile environments,” Doctrow said.

Captivated by swampy jungle places, exotic plants and a variety of habitats, Doctrow has completed art residencies at Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve and Archbold Biological Station. She recently received a grant from the Florida Department of Cultural Affairs to build nine ‘shrine boxes’ featuring local plants along a nature trail at South Florida Community College.

Originally from southern California, Doctrow graduated from California State University, Northridge with a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Arts in printmaking. She is currently the curator at the South Florida Community College’s Museum of Florida Art and Culture in Avon Park.

The exhibit is free and open through April 18, 2010.

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Writer: Patti Nunez
Media contact: Paul Ramey, 352-273-2054, pramey@flmnh.ufl.edu