Jan. 22 History Channel program on Atlantis features Fla. Museum archaeologist

January 19th, 2007

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The legend of Atlantis has captured the imagination of many. Go in search of the fabled continent with Florida Museum of Natural History archaeology curator William Keegan at 9 p.m. Jan. 22 on the History Channel. Keegan is featured on the program “Digging for the Truth: Atlantis: New Revelations.”

The show’s host, Josh Bernstein investigates the evidence for Atlantis in the Bahamas and the Mediterranean. Bernstein joins Keegan at the Clifton National Heritage Park on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, where Keegan explains exposed beach rock formations. They also excavate a test unit at the Lucayan archaeological site at Clifton to obtain a sample of beach rock for radiocarbon dating.

“Filming this program was a novel experience,” Keegan said. “Using one camera they did numerous takes of the same scene from different angles and perspectives. The hardest part was remembering exactly how I moved, exactly where I stood, and working without a written script. The production crew was fantastic and the product will undoubtedly be a very unbiased account of the legend of Atlantis.” (more…)

Wild Florida frontier topic of Florida Museum lecture Feb. 19

February 9th, 2006

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida Museum of Natural History Curator of Archaeology Jerald T. Milanich will share stories and antics from his newly released book from 2-3 p.m. Feb. 19 as part of the Florida Museum’s Science Sunday lecture series. Following the lecture, Milanich will offer a book signing. Books are available for purchase in the Florida Museum’s Collectors Shop.

Milanich’s book, “Frolicking Bears, Wet Vultures and Other Oddities: A New York City Journalist in Nineteenth-Century Florida,” compiles the wanderings and musings of Amos Jay Cummings as he explores the Florida frontier in the late 1800s. Through his book, Milanich uncovers how Cummings’ writing about “bruins and buzzards; rednecks and racists; murderers and mosquitoes; rich soils and poor souls” reveals the untamed frontier that once was Florida.

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Fla. Museum archaeology curator receives travel writer award

September 8th, 2005

For Immediate Release Sept. 8, 2005

Contact:
Paul Ramey, Dir. of Marketing and Public Relations
Florida Museum of Natural History
(352) 846-2000, ext. 218, pramey@ufl.edu
Writer: Emily Banks
PHOTO AVAILABLE

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida Museum of Natural History Curator in Archaeology Jerald Milanich will be awarded the second place Ken Meeker Travel Writer Award Sept. 13 for his “Water World” article, which appeared in the September-October 2004 issue of “Archaeology Magazine.”

The Sanibel & Captiva Islands Chamber of Commerce presents the annual travel writer awards to the top three articles about tourist destinations in the Sanibel and Captiva Islands area. The competition is open to journalists worldwide. In addition to the award, Milanich also will receive a $500 cash prize.

During his career, which spans more than three decades, Milanich has published more than 190 books, articles and other publications, received 64 academic grants and supervised more than 100 graduate students — many who currently practice archaeology in Florida and throughout the Americas. His role as Bullen Series editor for the University Press of Florida, as well as other editorial positions, have helped disseminate Florida archaeology information globally.

Milanich has held various appointed and elected positions in the professional archaeological community, including president of the Society of Professional Archaeologists from 1981-1982 and president of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference from 1986-1988. He also was named among the University of Florida’s top researchers in 1987. Milanich received a Medalist Award in 2004 by the Florida Academy of Sciences and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Florida Archaeological Council in 2005.

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The Florida Museum of Natural History is Florida’s state natural history museum, dedicated to understanding, preserving and interpreting biological diversity and cultural heritage. It is located near the intersection of Southwest 34th Street and Hull Road in the University of Florida Cultural Plaza in Gainesville. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Florida Museum is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. Butterfly Rainforest admission is $7.50 for adults and $4.50 for children ages 3-12. For more information, including directions and parking information, call (352) 846-2000, or visit the museum online, www.flmnh.ufl.edu.

Fla. Museum archaeology curator to receive lifetime achievement award

May 12th, 2005

Photo avaliable

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Florida Museum of Natural History Curator of Archaeology Jerald T. Milanich will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Florida Archaeological Council at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, May 13. The ceremony will be held during the council’s 25th anniversary celebration and the Florida Anthropological Society’s 57th anniversary meeting reception, held in unison at the Florida Museum.

Milanich is one of only three people to ever receive this award. During his career, which spans more than three decades, Milanich has published more than 190 books, articles and other miscellaneous publications, received 64 academic grants and supervised more than 100 graduate students, many who currently practice archaeology in Florida and throughout the Americas. His role as Bullen Series editor for the University Press of Florida, as well as other editorial positions, have helped disseminate Florida archaeology information globally.

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Fla. Museum to display rare Amazonian artifacts confiscated in federal investigation

April 12th, 2005

Photos avaliable

What:

The Florida Museum of Natural History has been given a collection of rare and illegally imported Amazonian artifacts from Brazil that it plans to add to its collection and use in developing a national traveling exhibition. The more than 200 items in the collection include ceremonial masks, earrings, necklaces and headdresses, musical instruments, blow guns and darts, bows and arrows, spears and baskets. The Florida Museum will display some of the most valuable and attractive items Wednesday morning.

When:
Wednesday, April 13, 2005, 10:30 a.m

Where:
Florida Museum of Natural History, Powell Hall, located in the University of Florida Cultural Plaza near the intersection of Southwest 34th Street and Hull Road.

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