Fla. Museum, Alachua Astronomy Club present "Starry Night" April 13

April 6th, 2006

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The Florida Museum of Natural History and the Alachua Astronomy Club will offer “Starry Night: A Guided Tour of the Universe” from 5 to 10 p.m. April 13, featuring presentations, planetarium shows and star viewing. “Starry Night” will be held at the Florida Museum as part of its Museum Nights program.

At 7 p.m., astrophysicist Fred Adams, University of Michigan, will discuss the fate of the universe in his lecture, “Where Are We Going? The Future History of Our Universe.” Light refreshments will be provided. There is no admission charge for this event.

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Fla. Museum, astronomy club offer Mars viewing Nov. 12

October 27th, 2005

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The Florida Museum of Natural History and the Alachua Astronomy Club will offer “Magnificent Mars” from 7 to 10 p.m. Nov. 12, featuring presentations and telescope viewings of Mars and other celestial bodies. Fall nights in 2005 are expected to give the best views of Mars for U.S. observers in the last 50 years.

There is no admission charge for this event. For more information, visit http://www.floridastars.org/marsopp.2005.html.

Media Contact: Paul Ramey,  (352) 846-2000,  pramey@ufl.edu
Writer: Emily Banks

 

Fla. Museum hosts last Florida eclipse viewing until 2014

March 21st, 2005

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The Florida Museum of Natural History and Alachua Astronomy Club will host a partial solar eclipse viewing from 5 – 7:30 p.m. April 8 on the lawn in front of the University of Florida Cultural Plaza parking garage. “Celestial Celebrations” is free and open to the public and will allow guests an up-close view of the last solar eclipse visible from North Central Florida until 2014.

Alachua Astronomy Club members will provide telescopes with solar filters for safe viewing of the eclipse and sunspots, and be available to answer questions and provide assistance.

The eclipse will begin at 5:26 p.m. and end at 7:08 p.m. At maximum eclipse, the moon will obscure approximately 34 percent of the sun.

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